Bob Graham Round Report

Well all good things must come to an end and my Bob Graham journey came to an end when I climbed the stairs and touched the door of the Moot Hall in Keswick at 7:19pm Saturday 24th June.
 

It was the culmination of 7 months of training and around 5 years of planning, procrastinating, talking and preparation – to say I was happy is an understatement.
 
I was working on a 22 hour schedule and my training had went well so I was confident going into round.
 
The forecast was mixed – wind increasing through the day and intermittent cloud, 70% of cloud free summits. At least I wasn’t going to be roasting in the 30 degree heat we’d had the previous weekend.
 
Upon arriving at the Denton House hostel where everyone was staying I was treated to a rousing rendition of happy birthday (yes it wasn’t a coincidence that I was doing my round on my 42nd birthday), and after having some food at Wetherspoons I tried to get some last minute rest in the dorm.
 
Leg 1 Keswick to Threlkeld
 
There was only myself and Bob Neil on the first leg. I felt a little guilty as it meant that he’d have to carry all my kit/food etc but Bob is a machine and I told I would return the favour when he decides to do a round of his own.
 
Harra, Phil James, Decca and Catherine Vicarage were planning on meeting us at the top of Great Calva where Harra had promised me a Custard Tart to celebrate my birthday.
 
I set off at 10pm at which point it was still light and we made good progress, passing Harra and co just after Latrigg Car Park. About half way up Jenkin Hill we were into the clag – no big deal as the path up Skiddaw is like a motorway but the temperature dropped and it started to rain so it was time for my waterproof and buff.
 
We reached the top around 5 minutes up on schedule and conditions had deteriorated again. The wind was gusting across the top blowing the rain into our faces and there was no point in putting our head torches on as the light just reflected straight back at us.
 
We dropped down to the right of the path to find the fence line and style which we did no problem and crossed over and picked up the grassy trod. It was now like being in a different world, we were sheltered from the wind, the clag had lifted and it had even stopped raining.
 
It was the usual quagmire going over Hare Crag but we made good progress and reached the top of Calva without any issues, however we were alone and it was clear enough to see that there was no-one else around. I was a little worried but took comfort from the fact that there were 4 of them and assumed they must have turned back. Harra and Jamsie have been to Calva before and with their years of experience they would make sure nothing bad happened…
 
Coming off Calva we found the trod no problem and started the slog up Mungrisdale Common on the way to Blencathra. I had decided to descent via Doddick Fell instead of Halls Fell as I’ve always been quicker coming down that way. Although not as bad as Skiddaw the clag was still blowing in and out and the rocks were greasy so my mind was definitely made up.
 
Coming down from Blencathra we slightly overshot the turn off to Doddick Fell and had to retrace our steps but I realised straight away so a few minutes lost but no big deal.
 
Before I knew it we were running through Threlkeld and into the first changeover. I said goodbye to Bob who was again going home to do his post round. I had lost the time I made on Skiddaw on the decent from Blencathra but was bang on schedule and I felt great.
 
Gillian, Steve and John were waiting for me and made sure I had food and drinks available – I quickly had a sandwich, cup of coffee and took a banana for the road.
 

 
Leg 2 – Threlkeld to Dunmail Raise
 
Accompanying me on the next leg were Iain Armstrong, Jim Thompson and Chris Redfern and we set off at a gentle jog towards the next big climb of Clough Head. My biggest strength is probably my climbing, especially the really big steep climbs of which Clough Head is one. Unfortunately, this was bad news for Chris who had dropped off the back and as we once more entered the clag again near the top we lost sight of him.
 
We reached the top without him and I made the decision to push on instead of waiting. I did feel bad about this but it had become colder so I didn’t want to hang around and I also still felt good and wanted to keep moving as there is good time to be made on this section. Chris had done the leg before so I hoped he would be able to get back down ok.
 
Once at the top it is possible to take a more direct line through the Dodds as a shortcut so he may have been able to catch us up, however it was still dark and the clag was down so it would have been difficult for him to find that line.
 
We proceeded to the next fell, Great Dodd but descending from there we veered a little too far to the left and had to make up some ground so lost a few minutes but just like Doddick Fell nothing to be concerned about.
 
The Dodds are easy to navigate in good weather but in mist they can be tricky and Jim did a great job in getting me through them whilst Iain was feeding me Kendal Mint Cake.
 

 
As we reached Helvellyn Lower Man the wind was getting stronger and I was becoming increasingly colder. Jim must have sensed this as he asked how I was doing. He suggested stopping at the shelter on Helvellyn to put some more layers on but I wanted to push on – I knew that in around half an hour we would descend to Grisedale Tarn and it would be significantly warmer and more sheltered down there so I didn’t mind being uncomfortable until then.
 
We descended Dollywagon Pike via the fenceline down to the tarn and I was warm again. The clag had also cleared and for the first time I was able to take in and enjoy the magnificent views. Ticking off Fairfield amd Seat Sandal, the last peak on the leg we then made good time on the lovely grassy descent to Dunmail Raise and leg 2 was done and dusted – 17 minutes ahead of schedule.
 
I was glad to see Chris there. He had made it back safely despite being sent the wrong way by another BGR group and visiting the summit of Clough Head twice.
 
My right hip had been hurting a little on the descents on this leg so I took some painkillers which seemed to sort it out as it didn’t bother me again. My foot was also hurting so I hoped the painkillers would help that too.
 
Again I was overwhelmed by the amount of food and drink that Gillian & Steve had prepared for me. I had some baked beans+sausages, pasta, coffee and flat coke and some chia seeds. Keith took a few sandwiches for me for the climb up Steel Fell and then we were away.
 

 
Leg 3, Dunmail Raise to Wasdale
 
Peter and Gemma had set of about 10 minutes before us and we reconvened at the top of Steel Fell. This next section was very boggy but Keith took some good lines to try and avoid the worst of it.
 

 
When we reached the top of High Raise we could see another group of walkers who looked like they were taking part in some sort of organised challenge. It turns out they were competing in a 10 peak challenge and we encountered many more of them during the remainder of this leg and the next.
 

 
We pressed on and by the time we reached the Langdale Pikes Keith told me I was 15 minutes up on schedule and suggested we have a quick break which we did.
 

 
Looking over we could see the Scafells shrouded in mist which was going to make the next section tricky. This section between Bowfell and Scafell is the most technical and rocky of the round and also the most difficult to navigate – Ill Crag and Broad Crag are huge boulder fields which are seldom visited because of their proximity to Scafell Pike.
 

 
The climb up Bowfell is biggest on this leg but I’ve always enjoyed it and we made swift progress to the top and into the clag which would last until Scafell.
 
Esk Pike was ticked off and then we set off towards Great End. In good conditions you can take a more direct line to the top, however Keith told me because of the conditions he preferred to stick to the path as the summit is quite flat so finding the summit cairn would be tricky in the clag.
 
Progress over Ill Crag and Broad Crag was very slow because of the slippery rocks (it’s difficult to make fast progress at the best of times) – there are deep gaps between some of the huge boulders in which you could easily break a leg if you slipped so I was very cautious. There were a lot of the 10 peaks walkers on this section -at the top of Scafell Pike Keith told them I was doing 42 peaks and I got a round of applause which was nice.
 

 
Descending towards Mickledore Keith was a little concerned we were on the right track and we stopped for a few minutes just to check bearings and look at a more detailed map. Within a minute of continuing we were at the stretcher box, confirming our position and I was relieved – I have complete faith in Keith’s navigation and he had gotten me through the toughest part in very poor conditions.
 
I had originally planned to climb Broad Stand but unfortunately Jonny’s daughter had netball trials so he had to pull out so we went via Lords Rake and the West Wall Traverse instead whilst Gemma and Peter descended on the tourist path to meet us at Wasdale. For anyone who has not done this route I would thoroughly recommend it – it’s one of the most exhilarating ways to a mountain top up a very steep scree slope which cuts across Scafell Crag and then another steep traverse to the summit – you really get the feeling you are inside the mountain.
 
Keith wanted to stop for a few minutes at the top of Scafell which we did, before the long descent to Wasdale. We came down the 2nd scree shoot from Rakehead Crag which was much better than the 1st scree shoot I had come down a few months earlier and I really enjoyed the descent. I think I spent most of the steep grassy section after the scree coming down on my arse – it was certainly faster than running!
 

 
Gemma and Peter met us at the stream and we all ran into the National Trust car park together to complete the leg.
 

 
Wasdale is a pivotal point in the round and a one where many people give up – the long descent from Scafell is a real quad thrasher and the next climb up Yewbarrow is probably the most brutal of the round – it’s extremely steep and relentless so it was good to be coming in still feeling really strong. Paul Richardson informed me that we were going to play a game of the tortoise and the hare, his way of telling me that he was setting off up Yewbarrow before me.
 
Steve washed my feet for me and Gillian cleaned my shoes and got all the scree out of them. I also brushed my teeth to stave off any potential ulcers from all the sweet stuff I’d been eating (a problem Jim told me he had suffered with).
 
I’d lost 35 minutes on leg 3 – a combination of going via Lords Rake instead of Broad Stand, and the poor conditions. This combined with a longer than scheduled stop meant I was 33 minutes down on schedule leaving Wasdale. This didn’t concern me at all though as I still had an hour and a half contingency and I was still feeling strong and moving well.

 

Leg 4, Wasdale to Honister
 

 
As well as Paul who had already set off John Butters and Fred Smith were also accompanying me on this leg. John set a good pace going up Yewbarrow (or Yew-B**tard as he calls it) and half way up Fred informed me that we were on 36 minute pace and not 47 minute pace (per my schedule) but it felt comfortable and I made 12 minutes on the climb and another 6 on the next climb to Red Pike at which point we were back in the clag again.
 

 
This might have taken its toll on me as for the first time I started to feel a little tired and my foot was also hurting again. Luckily it didn’t last long and a cup of tea from Fred, slice of maltloaf, a gel and some painkillers after Steeple sorted me out.
 

 
Descending from Pillar the clag cleared revealing fantastic views down into Wasdale and Ennerdale – Paul commented that “you can see the pub from here”.
 

 
You could certainly see the Wasdale Head Inn but I still had a long way to reach the pubs of Keswick. We ascended Kirk Fell via the Ennerdale race gulley at which point we stopped for a quick snack and admired the views.
 

 

On the top of Kirk Fell we were joined by Jim Thompson, Dave Bradburn and Simon Long who had ran in from Honister via Moses Trod to run the final section of the leg with me. Iain had also planned on meeting me here but I learnt later that he had been in some pain on leg 2 so decided against it which was totally understandable.
 
There was only one big climb left now up to Great Gable which I enjoyed and Paul took a good line on the descent, bearing right of the path to avoid the rocky scramble.
 

 
The next section over Green Gable, Brandreth and Grey Knotts was good running – unbeknown to us Satch was waiting for us on the top to Grey Knotts but unfortunately none of us saw him.
 

 
Another fast descent and I was running into Honister feeling absolutely fantastic. There was never a point when I thought that I wasn’t going to make it but it still felt good to running into the last changeover and seeing everyone there waiting for me.
 

 
As well as my support team my friends Malcom Lewis and Helen Stephenson were also at Honister and it was great to see them although I wasn’t able to speak to them much – save that for Keswick…
 
I had made 38 minutes on the leg which meant I was now 5 minutes up on schedule.

 

Leg 5, Honister to Keswick
 

 
John Walton, Harra, Phil James, Simon Long, Andrew Softly and Catherine Vicarage set off shortly after I arrived at Honister to get a head start.
 
After a quick toilet stop I set off up the final big climb of Dale Head with Tim Forster, Dave Bradburn and John Butters. catching up with the rest of the team at the top and Malcolm who had also walked up.
 

 
Some of the team went straight on and cut out Hindsgarth which is pretty much an out and back. Then it was time for the final climb and the final peak, Robinson. It felt fantastic to touch the last cairn – number 42 – just the run in to Keswick to go now.
 

 
I had previously told Tim that I wanted to take the grassy alternative to the rocky scramble at the top of Robinson so we veered off the path. We went a little too far to the right and ended up at the top of the crags and had to come back up a little but it wasn’t a big deal. Soon we were descending the lovely grassy descent down to the tarn where I paused with John B. Looking back up I could see everyone coming down but there was no sign of John W. Someone shouted that he had rolled his ankle and that Dave B had went back up for him.
 
Tim told me to push on so I did down the path and eventually joining the road. As we approached Little Town we spotted Steve and Gillian waiting by the road up ahead –  I think were surprised to see us so early and raced off ahead to get back to the car park before us.
 

 
A quick change into road shoes and my Saltwell vest and it was time for the final 4.5 miles along the road. I still felt great so made good time on this section running with John B and Andrew with the others following behind and before I knew it we were on the outskirts of Keswick.
 
The feeling of running up Keswick high street with everyone cheering me on was incredible and I raced up the steps to touch the door of the Moot Hall 21 hours and 19 minutes after setting off from there the previous night.
 

 
Steve handed me a pint and I stood at the top of the steps and tried to contemplate what I had just achieved – 66 miles, 42 peaks and 27,000ft of ascent.
 

 
Iain was one of the first to congratulate me and welcome me to the club which was a fantastic feeling after all the training we have done together and supporting him on his round 4 weeks previously.
 

 
The rest of the team then started to come in, first Phil, then Tim , Harra, Catherine & Simon , Dave and finally John W who’d valiantly pushed on and completed the run in – I was glad to see him and relieved that he was ok.
 

 

 
Gemma told me I needed to have something to eat so we retreated to the Kings Arms and she very kindly bought me some Fish and Chips, although I only managed about half of them. I stayed in the pub for another hour or so before walking back to the Hostel and finally getting some much awaited sleep.

 

Epilogue
 

So what are the main things I learnt from my round? For me the hardest part was constantly eating and drinking. It’s totally different to the way I train and I had to force myself to keep taking fuel on board. I did feel a bit sickly a few times because of all the sugar but it didn’t affect my running & passed after a while.
 
One of the pieces of advice Keith gave me beforehand was to enjoy the day and I can honestly say that I enjoyed every last second of it. Amazingly I didn’t have a bad patch and never had a single negative thought enter my mind. I never thought about how long or far I had left to go or what climbs were left – on every leg I just looked forward to seeing my support crew at the changeovers and running with them.
 
I’ve probably done more training than most people would for a round and I think this was the biggest factor in why I felt so good on the day and didn’t have any issues. I was also able to regularly eat and drink, even though most of the time I didn’t really feel like it.
 
I didn’t have any soreness in my legs at all which meant I could take the descents (relatively) fast – the only problem I had was my soreness in the balls of feet which I’ve had for months and I was able to run through that.
 
I must also give a massive thanks to all my support team. Amongst others I had the 2 reigning winners (male and female) of the Chevy Chase and 6 people who have previously completed the round running with me. I simply could not have a better team and I want to especially thank Steve, Gillian and John – it was a very long day for them too and they couldn’t have looked after me any better.
 
I would thoroughly recommend anyone who has an interest in fell running to give the round a go – as long as you can get the right training in beforehand then you are definitely in with a shout.
 
I wrote a blog in preparation which is here http://www.saltwellharriers.org.uk/category/rob/ and my strava route is here https://www.strava.com/activities/1052246111
 

 
Oh, and if you’re wondering what happened to the Calva Party…. Well they missed the turn off and ended going half way up Skiddaw. No-one had a map but luckily Catherine was able to use an app on her phone to pinpoint their location and after attempting to pick up the right path they decided to call it a night and retreat back to the car.

 

 
Rob Brooks
 

Scafell Pike race report

I entered this race on a whim. I was aware of how challenging it was likely to be as a running CV was required for entry to check you were capable of it. This was my third marathon. My first was Windermere, a hilly road race and my second was the St. Oswald’s ultra, a flat trail race. I put these down hoping it would be enough to get me a place. It did. 
 
In hindsight had I known exactly what it would entail I am not sure I would have entered. 
 
My training, I thought, was good. I managed a few long training runs on hilly trails, I also spent a lot of time walking up my stairs to try and get my climbing muscles strengthened. One day I climbed 3000 feet just going up and down stairs. On reflection, post race, I think it was the best it could be considering my need to stay local (I don’t drive), injury free and fit it around family and work life.
 
Race day came, It was a 4am start and I had no sleep the night before. I woke up at 2am and plotted the route on my ordinance survey app on my phone as a back up just in case Adrian (my running buddy) had a problem with his gpx file. This was a Godsend as his watch conked out at mile 5 and we had no navigation. 
 
There was a 3-mile walk to the start, a beautiful cafe on the edge of the lake. Seeing the other runners made me realise I was perhaps a little out of my depth. For most races, you get a mixture of people in varying shapes, sizes and kit. This lot all looked built for fell running and extremely experienced. There was maybe 200 of us. 
 
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The race started with an easy bit of flat running along the shores of the lake. I actually found this extremely hard. I couldn’t get my pace right and my backpack had about 7kg of stuff in it. I hadn’t anticipated how hard running my usual pace would be carrying the mandatory kit, a kilo of food and 2.5L of fluid. (The fluid may seem excessive but it saved me later on) Naz my fellow Harrier quickly found his own stride and ploughed on ahead. 
 
The scenery was absolutely stunning, it felt like running through Jurassic Park. I was still struggling, my heart rate wouldn’t drop below peak and I was finding it difficult to run at a 9-10 minute mile. I think had I been on my own at this point I would have slowed to regroup but I was also conscious that the many experienced runners around us seemed to be belting along and we were amongst the slowest. 
 
I was saved by our first climb about 5 miles in, it was only 500ft but was steep and I could walk it. This brought my heart rate down and I felt better for it. Though it did make me chuckle in hindsight that the first ‘bump’ was the same elevation as running from the Team Valley to Tanfield Railway (my longest hill in training). For members of the club who might not have ran that, the same elevation is running the Team Valley to the top of Sheriff hill. 
 
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Once at the top the views were stunning, Naz was with us for a while but ran on ahead as I had decided to walk some of the more technical uphill sections after seeing some runners go over on their ankles. The downhill back into the valley was fun but steep and my Saltwell Harriers downhill running training really helped here until the road section where I let loose and felt my familiar left glute/IT band niggle that always appears around mile 8 and psyches me out. 
 
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We picked up the pace on the road section and caught up with Naz again at the feed station at Seathwaite. I started drinking at this point and had my first bit of food for the day. 
 
The ground from then on was not what I would class as ‘trail’ it was littered with boulders, loose rocks, tree roots, streams. It was hard to run on and we were uphill into the wind. I decided to walk bits of it as the extra effort running wouldn’t have gained us much time and I was conscious of what was to come. We stumbled along the valley at the tail end of the pack until we reached the little bridge and the beginning of our ascent. 
 
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We met up with a lovely woman who was really struggling with cramp and Adrian gave her some electrolytes. She was contemplating dropping out. Adrian had brought along a single cheat stick with his two (its partner had been lost at the top of Scafell Pike the year before) which he got out for me at this point. It took about half an hour to get my head around how to use it but it was very very welcome to take some pressure off my glute which was very sore. 
 
The ascent of Scafell Pike was relentless. I have never found anything so tough. I struggled with being really small as my decreased stride length meant I had more steps to take and couldn’t get up the steeper crags in one stride having to go on all fours. The wind was in our faces and being able to see how far up we still had to travel was demoralising. I am pretty much the fittest and strongest I have ever been but this was something else in terms of the relentless physical slog. 
 
Halfway up Ade lost his footing and fell into a waterfall. He badly hurt both knees and fractured his fingers. Any other time it would have been a trip to the hospital but halfway up Scafell you just have to suck it up. This set us back a few minutes whilst we regrouped but we ploughed on. 
 
The ascent continued, making slow progress and scrambling up sharp vertical cliffs in places. I can honestly say I was genuinely frightened for my life on a few occasions. The approach to the summit was awash with annoying tourists in bobble hats eating Hula Hoops and playing on their mobile phones. At this point, I wanted to murder someone as I couldn’t handle the Instagram fest going on at the top or how any of them were physically capable of getting up there after the horror I had just endured. 
 
We reached the summit where a medic saw to Adrian’s hand and told us if we didn’t get a move on we were woefully close to not meeting the cut off time at the Seathwaite check in. 
 
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I went into panic mode and pegged it. My foot got stuck in a boulder and I almost broke my ankle. I was absolutely exhausted, my nutrition had screwed up as I had forgotten to eat and drink on the ascent and I honestly thought I couldn’t carry on. The path came down an almost vertical drop of loose muddy gravel peppered with large boulders which were difficult to get traction on and made slow progress. We then had to climb a few hundred feet over another ridge and across a huge boulder field to start our descent. 
 
This bit was mint! I just let go, the trail was uneven but manageable and not too steep. I just legged it down the side of the mountain. I realised this path had been the one the Hula Hoop eaters had climbed the mountain on as it was a gentle climb up. I ran down mentally pulling Adrian along behind me. I realised at this point that what had hindered me climbing was my advantage when descending. Being little with short strides and a low centre of gravity meant I could skip between boulders and run fast downhill on technical terrain. 
 
We reached the stretcher box halfway down and checked in, then continued into the valley. Here electrolyte lady caught up with us and thanked us for getting her up the mountain. Because of Ade’s electrolytes, she got past her cramp and made it up. She was clearly a strong runner and left us behind here. 
 
We carried on along the valley back to Seathwaite for 3pm, well within cut off. I was so relieved, I stuffed my face and drank everything they had. I had a water bottle with me I refilled with juice and we set back off in good spirits. 
 
I found the last third the hardest I think. I was a whirlwind of emotions. The path was uneven and hard to run on and I was really tired. We started running and slogged along through beautiful countryside and hundreds of gated fields. It became a bit of a running joke that I had shut down my cognitive skills as lost the ability to work out how to open gates. I literally couldn’t do it. 
 
Then we had a couple of miles talking about how much we hated it and that we were never doing it again and what were we thinking? Then at mile 21, there was a hill that was pretty much a half mile vertical climb. I just lost it here. I was fighting back tears, my legs were on fire and I was unable to cope emotionally or physically. Adrian was way ahead of me as he is much stronger at climbing than I am and I remember him reaching the top and fist bumping the sky to say we were there. I followed and rounded the corner shouting the worst swear words you can imagine only to find myself face to face wth a shocked family of walkers, I hope I apologised, I can’t remember if I did or not.
 
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The next section was also hard as the downhills were too technical to run well on, they were very steep and rocky. My lack of experience showed on all these stretches as I couldn’t let loose. I knew how far we had come and how close we were to the finish to risk injury. Once the path levelled out I started running again and began overtaking other runners. I saw the final aid station ahead and SPRINTED to it so I could eat maximum rocky road and cookies before Adrian appeared. The marshal then told us we had 6k left.
  
“THATS JUST A RACE FOR LIFE OR A PARK RUN!” I screamed manically at Adrian. “Let’s imagine we are in pink tutus and just get this done!”
  
I was like a woman possessed. I was running an 8-minute mile in places as we had a brief road section. I was pelting past other runners, with Adrian pegging it along behind. We caught electrolytes lady who fell in with us. There was a long stretch along the edge of a cliff face but the terrain was ok so I ran most of it. The final mile was along the edge of the lake and I just sprinted. I knew Jon was at the end and I needed a cuddle so I just went as fast as I could. I sprinted over the finish and collapsed. I found Naz in a similar state who had come in 15 minutes ahead of me. There is something special about sharing an experience like that. 
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I have never found anything so tough in my whole life and this includes a 72-hour labour with twins. It was a truly humbling experience and made me realise what a close relationship both the mental and physical side of running have to each other. It is mentally exhausting running on uneven terrain as you have to anticipate every footfall before it happens and concentrate completely. I urge everyone to get off road once in a while to run… but perhaps don’t run up Kibblesworth / Tanfield bank and then decide you can run up Scafell Pike.
 
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Laura Gledhill – 9th of July 2017
 

Saltwell Fell Race Results 2017

POSITION NAME CLUB AGE CAT TIME
1 LEE BENNETT NFR M45 45.52
2 PAUL LOWE DARLINGTON HARRIERS M SEN 46.07
3 ANDY GREEN TYNEDALE HARRIERS M50 46.25
4 CHRIS THAIN HEATON M SEN 46.50
5 CHRISTOPHER HENDERSON U/A M SEN 47.07
6 JAMES OSBORN DFR M SEN 47.10
7 DAVID BEST BLACKHILL BOUNDERS M40 47.14
8 PAUL BRONGER DERWENT VALLEY RUNNING CLUB M SEN 47.18
9 JAMES McELRUE BLACKHILL BOUNDERS M SEN 47.34
10 IAIN ARMSTRONG SALTWELL HARRIERS M SEN 47.40
11 PAUL HODGSON DFR M SEN 47.53
12 GEORGE COOPER DFR M SEN 48.22
13 ANDY BLACKETT DFR M SEN 51.49
14 JONATHAN HEANEY NORTH SHIELDS POLY M40 54.11
15 JONA AAL U/A M SEN 54.51
16 SCOTT WATSON ELVET STRIDERS M50 54.59
17 IAN McAUSLAN HEATON HARRIERS M SEN 55.05
18 IAN SUMLER-HUTCHINSON CROOK AC M50 55.08
19 STEPHEN COLLINS BLACKHILL BOUNDERS M SEN 55.30
20 JACK LEE ELVET STRIDERS M SEN 55.35
21 ADAM MALLOY DERWENT VALLEY RUNNING CLUB M SEN 55.38
22 NATALIE CURGENVEN DARLINGTON HARRIERS W SEN 55.52
23 SEB BUFTON SALTWELL HARRIERS M SEN 56.13
24 PHIL GREEN NFR M45 56.20
25 GEMMA BRADLEY SALTWELL HARRIERS W SEN 56.23
26 CHRIS DWYER SUNDERLAND STROLLERS M SEN 56.26
27 ALEX COOK HEATON HARRIERS M SEN 56.29
28 SIMON LONG SALTWELL HARRIERS M40 57.17
29 IAN HUTCHINSON DERWENT VALLEY TRAIL RUNNERS M SEN 57.40
30 GEOFF DAVIS NFR M60 57.50
31 MARIE-LOUISE RIDLEY DFR W50 58.20
32 STEVE LUMB DFR M55 58.20
33 CHRISTOPH HELD U/A M SEN 58.30
34 KEITH MCCLEAN LOW FELL RUNNING CLUB M40 58.42
35 ALAN LANGFORD HEATON HARRIERS M45 58.49
36 FRASER BROWN U/A M SEN 58.59
37 KAREN ROBERTSON NFR W45 59.05
38 MICK MONKMAN U/A M40 59.07
39 STEPHEN CURRIE SALTWELL HARRIERS M45 59.10
40 COLETTE WHITFIELD HEATON HARRIERS W SEN 59.20
41 BERNIE GIBSON DERWENT VALLEY RUNNING CLUB W50 59.20
42 SCOTT GARRETT SALTWELL HARRIERS M40 59.32
43 JONATHAN GRAY DARLINGTON HARRIERS M40 59.55
44 JILL BENNETT NFR W40 60.06
45 MARCUS BYRON TYNEDALE HARRIERS M50 60.13
46 LES BELLIS HEATON HARRIERS M50 60.23
47 ANDREW CALLICOTT DERWENT VALLEY RUNNING CLUB M50 60.27
48 ALLON WELSH NFR M50 60.35
49 BIANCA McELRUE BLACKHILL BOUNDERS W SEN 60.39
50 PAUL STEPHENSON DERWENT VALLEY RUNNING CLUB M45 60.41
51 TERRY TOPPING SUNDERLAND STROLLERS M50 60.43
52 EDDIE PEAT DFR M55 60.45
53 CLAIRE MATTHEWS DFR W40 60.50
54 MARK LATHAM NFR M55 60.52
55 MARK BAXTER U/A M40 60.55
56 LUKE McCORMACK SUNDERLAND STROLLERS M SEN 60.57
57 JAMIE BALDESERA DARLINGTON HARRIERS M SEN 61.02
58 GARY MASON KESWICK AC M55 61.13
59 PETER MULLARKEY SALTWELL HARRIERS M55 61.21
60 ELIZABETH BRIDGE ELVET STRIDERS W SEN 61.24
61 DALE WILKINSON SUNDERLAND STROLLERS M50 61.35
62 BERNARD KIVLEHAN NFR M55 61.46
63 ROB MASSON SALTWELL HARRIERS M SEN 61.59
64 MARK O’KELLY SALTWELL HARRIERS M SEN 62.02
65 DENISE TUNSTALL DFR W50 62.24
66 MARTIN CROOKS U/A M45 62.25
67 SHARON COOK HEATON HARRIERS W SEN 62.59
68 PAUL TAYLOR SALTWELL HARRIERS M55` 63.19
69 BETH LAWRY HEATON HARRIERS W SEN 64.18
70 PHILIP JOHNSTON NFR M SEN 64.32
71 DAVID AIKEN DARLINGTON HARRIERS M SEN 65.38
72 DAWN RICHARDSON QUAKERS RUNNING CLUB W45 66.55
73 JON PUNSHON NFR M60 73.58
74 DAWN COOPER DERWENT VALLEY RUNNING CLUB W SEN 75.09
75 NEIL EMBLETON DARLINGTON HARRIERS M40 76.03
76 FIONA KNOX U/A W50 76.30
77 CLAIRE OSBORN U/A W SEN 77.01
78 CHERYL STANLEY LOW FELL RUNNING CLUB W SEN 77.15
79 GRAHAM HARRISON SALTWELL HARRIERS M50 77.35
80 JAN YOUNG ELVET STRIDERS W60 77.40
81 LEAH HOBSON U/A W40 77.49
82 JIM MURPHY U/A M60 78.25
83 PHIL OWEN U/A M50 79.09
84 BARRY YOUNG NORTH SHIELDS POLY M55 82.17
85 DAVID BEAUMONT NFR M60 85.03